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Sebastian Lundström is a licensed psychologist who graduated from Lund University in 2007. In May 2011 he defended his PhD thesis named “Autistic-Like Traits”. His research interest lies within the field of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and concomitant conditions. By employing twin methodology it is possible, among other things, to discern if there are any true demarcations between disorders (for instance ASD vs. ADHD), and within disorders (ASD vs. normally distributed autistic-like traits). He mainly conducts research within the field of epidemiology, where the focus is on prevalence questions and transitions to adulthood for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). At the GNC Sebastian Lundström is currently conducting clinical research within an imaging study aimed at understanding the brain physiology in ASD.

Photo: Josefin Bergenholtz

  • CLICK HERE FOR SEBASTIAN LUNDSTRÖM'S RESEARCH RESOURCES

    2017

    Lundström, S. "The increase in autism prevalence". Source: Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre www.gnc.gu.se


    2015

    Lundström, S. "Symtom på autism har inte ökat i Sverige". Source: Dagens Medicin www.dagensmedicin.se

     

    Lundström, S. "Twin method". Source: Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre www.gnc.gu.se


    2013

    Researcher's Corner between Nanna Gillberg and Sebastian Lundström. "Autistic-like traits with Sebastian Lundström". Source: Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre www.gnc.gu.se


    2011

     

    Lundström, S. "Autismliknande drag hos barn kartlagda i ny studie". Source: Sveriges Radio P1, Vetandets värld www.sverigesradio.se


     

Publications

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

Contact Information

Sebastian Lundström

Page Manager: Anna Spyrou|Last update: 2/28/2017
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